Bass Fishing In The United States

Angling for North America game fish is known as bass fishing. The species included in this sport are largemouth bass, smallmouth bass, Guadalupe bass and spotted bass. All black bass, which are typically found in lakes, ponds, reservoirs and rivers, are known by fishermen to be strong, resilient fighters.

Today, bass fishing has become a multibillion-dollar industry in the United States seeing a fast development in its’ fishing gear from rods and reels to lines and lures, and to instruments such as float tubes and drift boats. In fact, the black bass has become the second most popular game fishing in America.

A comparison of Largemouth bass and smallmouth bass according to ‘Waterman, Charles F., Black Bass & the Fly Rod, Stackpole Books (1993):

Largemouth

  • Greater overall size
  • Greater resistance when hooked
  • Short and powerful runs
  • Escape to cover

Smallmouth

  • Jump more
  • Fight aggressively on the surface
  • Attempt to throw the hook

Bass fishing in America has evolved naturally by itself, with today’s British sea bass fishermen looking across the pond for tips and help on technique. By the start of the 20th century bass fishing was a well-established sport. By half way through the century, angling tools for bass had developed extensively, which in turn boosted the number of bass being caught. This undoubtedly stimulated the sport further.

The increasing popularity of the sport has been combined with a catch and release policy. In order to quickly and safely return your catch to the water you can take a quick photo of the fish on your phone or digital camera, then, at a later date, size your fish from the photo using the FishFigure app. This practice of catch and release is found at the famous competitions found in the United States. The bass, once caught, are released as quickly as possible after the size of the fish has been taken and weighed by the officials. The most famous major bass competitions to be found are: Bassmasters and the FLW series.

If you are heading out bass fishing, or embarking on a trip soon, we would love to hear how you get on. Tight lines!